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Why Do You Need To Manage Thatch Levels In Your Lawn

Why Do You Need To Manage Thatch Levels In Your Lawn

The build-up of thatch is a layer of surface as well as under-surface dead grasses, clippings of grass, and moss that settles on your lawn as time passes. And then Lawn Care & Maintenance could be difficult. Naturally microbes, bacteria, and fungi that live in the soil break down organic matter. However, if your soil lacks microorganisms, it is ineffective at doing this. The organic matter slowly accumulates and is then compacted, forming a lawn thatch.
The formation of thatch is triggered when there is inadequate drainage and soil aeration. Incorrect lawn irrigation practices (usually excessive or frequent watering) and cold temperatures in the soil as well as the application of chemical pesticides and the application of fertilizers made from synthetic substances are all factors that contribute to the accumulation of thatch in lawns.
The excessive amount of thatch increases the grass's vulnerability to lawn ailments, as well as reduces its sensitivity to cold, drought, and heat stress. It also restricts the flow of water, air as well as fertilizers, and nutrients into the soil.
Organic matter like grass clippings, or leaves that have been mulched break down rapidly in healthy lawns. However other substances take longer to break down. If this build-up exceeds the rate of decomposition, your lawn's layer gets in thickness.
Thatch layers that are 1 inch or greater become obstacles instead of a source of benefit. It blocks the flow of water as well as fertilizer. Grass roots are trapped within thatch, making them susceptible to drought, heat, and stress. The water from irrigation can build up in the layer of thatch, as well, and the grassroots suffer from an absence of oxygen. It also serves as an ideal habitat for lawn diseases and insects.
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There aren't any lawns that require dethatching. However, if your lawn requires it knowing how to properly dethatch your lawn is vital for its long-term health. If done correctly, So, the team of Lawn Cleanup in Dallas help improve the health of your lawn and keeps it looking beautiful for the years to be. By understanding the reasons, why it is necessary, you should clean your lawn, and the best method to do it, you will be able to keep your lush, thick lawn healthy and lush.
Be sure to inspect your lawn's layer before removing it. Use a garden trowel or spade and remove small pieces of your lawn's dirt and grass. It will be possible to view and measure the thickness of its thatch layer. If the thickness of your thatch is 2 inches in size or larger, you've already noticed signs of poor grass color and thin, weak growth. After you've verified that your thatch is higher than the healthy limit the time to dethatch is now.
Thatch is an organic layer of living or dead organic matter which is found within the green layer and on the surface of the soil. A lot of thatch (over 1/2 inch thick) creates an ideal environment for disease and pests as well as a hostile condition for grass roots and may interfere with certain lawn maintenance practices.
It can cause damage to lawns. It is difficult for water to pass through the thick thatch layer which causes water to flow off instead of being absorbed. It could harbor bugs and lawn diseases and grass could begin to grow in the thatch layer, instead of soil resulting in shallow root systems and opening the layer to higher temperatures.
It is recommended to dethatch before Aerating your lawn. Aerating is the best option in the event of compaction. Both dethatching and aerating the lawn can improve air circulation as well as nutrient and water permeation into the roots of your lawn. Thatch is the most significant issue that these two methods address.
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Lawns should be cut back only when the conditions are optimal to ensure rapid recovery of the grass you have. The best time to cut back lawns that are cool-season is in the last week of August through the beginning of October, depending on the location you live in, as the grass is in full bloom and weed seeds are not likely to sprout. A small application of fertilizer ( 1/2 - 3/4 lbs of actual nitrogen per square foot) and regular, thorough watering will help speed up the process of recovering your lawn.
Dethatch lawns are warm-season in the late spring or in the early summer when they've established themselves and are growing quickly.
There are a variety of methods of removing the lawn. If your lawn has moderate amounts of thatch Aerating (more on this below) could be the answer. You can also use an axe called a cave (aka the lawn thatcher or rake)--which features unusual semicircular tines. These blades are like knives and cut through the soil and then pull the thatch out. If you have a large lawn with severe thatch issues the best solution is the vertical mower (aka the power rake). It resembles a powerful power mower but is equipped with a set of rotating vertical knives it cut through the thatch.
Dethatching is often a source of a large amount of debris that has to be cleared. If the debris is not weedy and you haven't applied pesticides or herbicides on the lawn, then compost it. Check to see whether your city has composting programs for yard garbage.